PORTUGAL WINE REGIONS

Portugal and England have the oldest diplomatic alliance in the world.

The Anglo-Portuguese Alliance was signed in 1373 and is in force until this day!  Both countries entered wars to defend the other, including the United Kingdom entering the Iberian Peninsular War and Portugal entering World War I.

 

Portugal is the 11th largest wine producer in the world.  It is most famous for the port it produces in the Douro Valley, one of 14 wine regions in Portugal. The Symington Family Estates is the most extensive vineyard owner in the Alto Douro and is the leading producer of premium port wines.

 

The Douro is the oldest demarcated wine region in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

 

The Minho Region is located in Northwest Portugal and is best known for its vinho verde or "green" wine, referring not to the colour of wine but to its unripe state, as this type of wine is meant to be drunk while it's still young and fresh. The actual colour of the wine is pale yellow like any other white wine.

 

The Alentejo region in southeast Lisbon has in recent years become a highly regarded wine-producing region.  With a very hot and dry climate the Alentejo produces concentrated red wines.

 

Setubal is a peninsula located across the Tagus River, south of Lisbon.  The region is famous for its Moscatel wine called Moscatel de Setubal.  The region's wine making history dates back to Roman times.